New Normal: Temperatures Are Trending Up Across U.S.

Normal temperatures, generally defined to be the 30-year average at a location, are trending up across most of the U.S. Since 1980, the average continental U.S. temperature has risen 1.4°F. In our analysis of normal temperatures in 244 cities across the country, 94 percent have risen, providing more evidence of the long-term warming trend on our

more

Heavy Rainfall Trends Across the U.S.

With flooding in parts of the Mississippi Valley and a strong Pacific storm coming into the Northwest, we examined the trend in the number of days each year with heavy precipitation at 244 individual sites in the U.S. This expands our nationwide-averaged heavy precipitation analysis from earlier this year, complementing the 2017 Climate Science

more

Western Snowpack Trends

April 1 marks the close of the winter precipitation season in the West, a good time to take stock of the snowpack in the mountains. The snow measurement indicates how much meltwater from that snowpack will be available for residential, agricultural, and commercial use during the dry summer months that follow. Even with the heavier snow in parts of

more

Cherry Blossoms in a Changing Climate

The blooming of the cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin of Washington, D.C. is an annual rite of spring. During the period from 1981-2010, the average peak bloom date was April 1. This year, the National Park Service forecasts the blossoms to peak slightly earlier than average, between March 27-31. The warm February was the reason that both the

more

Growing Season Growth: Additional Frost Free Days

​As the climate warms from the increase of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the last spring freeze is trending earlier and the first fall freeze is coming later. This means the growing season is getting longer, and so is the pollen season— whether it is from tree pollens in the spring, grass pollens in the summer, or ragweed in the fall. A

more

Climate Indicators

Learn more about the 10 key indicators of a warming climate

10

Arctic Sea Ice

Ice has both ecological and economic benefits and its extent could influence weather around the world.

link

El Niño

El Niño is a warming of waters in the equatorial Pacific that influences global weather patterns.

link

Ocean Acidification

Acidifying oceans can hurt coral reefs and shellfish as well as the people that rely on them for their livelihoods.

link

Carbon Dioxide

CO2 is a potent greenhouse gas and plays a vital role in regulating Earth's surface temperature through radiative forcing and the greenhouse effect

link

Extreme Heat

Increasing frequency and magnitude of extreme heat can affect health, power usage and more.

link

Snow Cover

A shorter snow season increases the amount of sunlight absorbed by the Earth’s surface and can further warm the planet.

link

Sea Level Rise

Sea level rise could force millions to leave coastal areas and cost the world trillions of dollars.

link

Land Ice

Melting land ice contributes to sea level rise.

link

U.S. Wildfires

Wildfires damage forests and release CO2.

link

Global Temperature

The global temperature is the clearest measure of how human greenhouse gas emissions are affecting our planet.

link