Climate Change on the Golf Course

Father’s Day and the U.S. Open are reminders that golf is a big economic driver. One trade study indicated that golf contributes more than $80 billion a year to the U.S. economy. And while golfers are infamous for playing in less-than-ideal conditions, extremes like heat, drought, and heavy rain that come with climate change are impacting the game

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Global Conveyer Belt: Ocean Current Slowing

June 8 is World Oceans Day, a time to raise awareness about the importance of the oceans to our planet. Ocean currents and broader circulations move vast amounts of water around the world, redistributing heat and energy, and helping regulate the global climate. Wind-driven currents like the cold California Current and the warm Gulf Stream are

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Climate Change and Rapidly Intensifying Hurricanes

Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1, and last year’s season was devastating for the U.S. Damage from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria cost the U.S. $267 billion. All three hurricanes went through a rapid intensification (RI) cycle, meaning the strongest winds within the storm increased by at least 30 knots (about 35 mph) in 24 hours. Harvey

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Drought & Deluge in 2018

In a warming world, a supercharged water cycle ramps up evaporation and precipitation. Warmer air creates higher evaporation rates from the soil, which worsens drought, stresses water supplies, and hampers agriculture. Evaporation of surface waters, such as lakes and oceans, also increases. A warmer atmosphere can hold more water before becoming sa

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hot summer days

Summer Days Are Getting Hotter

The summer solstice occurs at 6:07 a.m. EDT on June 21, marking the beginning of astronomical summer in the northern hemisphere. Meteorological summer, which consists of the three hottest climatological months of the year, started on June 1. No matter how you look at summer, it is the season with the most obvious climate change impact — extreme

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Golf courses are adapting to climate change

Climate Change on the Golf Course

Father’s Day and the U.S. Open are reminders that golf is a big economic driver. One trade study indicated that golf contributes more than $80 billion a year to the U.S. economy. And while golfers are infamous for playing in less-than-ideal conditions, extremes like heat, drought, and heavy rain that come with climate change are impacting the game

more
ocean circulation impacts

Global Conveyer Belt: Ocean Current Slowing

June 8 is World Oceans Day, a time to raise awareness about the importance of the oceans to our planet. Ocean currents and broader circulations move vast amounts of water around the world, redistributing heat and energy, and helping regulate the global climate. Wind-driven currents like the cold California Current and the warm Gulf Stream are

more
climate change and rapidly intensifying hurricanes

Climate Change and Rapidly Intensifying Hurricanes

Atlantic hurricane season starts June 1, and last year’s season was devastating for the U.S. Damage from Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria cost the U.S. $267 billion. All three hurricanes went through a rapid intensification (RI) cycle, meaning the strongest winds within the storm increased by at least 30 knots (about 35 mph) in 24 hours. Harvey

more
Drought and deluge in a warming world

Drought & Deluge in 2018

In a warming world, a supercharged water cycle ramps up evaporation and precipitation. Warmer air creates higher evaporation rates from the soil, which worsens drought, stresses water supplies, and hampers agriculture. Evaporation of surface waters, such as lakes and oceans, also increases. A warmer atmosphere can hold more water before becoming sa

more
30-year temperature average in the U.S.

New Normal: Temperatures Are Trending Up Across U.S.

Normal temperatures, generally defined to be the 30-year average at a location, are trending up across most of the U.S. Since 1980, the average continental U.S. temperature has risen 1.4°F. In our analysis of normal temperatures in 244 cities across the country, 94 percent have risen, providing more evidence of the long-term warming trend on our

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change in days with heavy precip

Heavy Rainfall Trends Across the U.S.

With flooding in parts of the Mississippi Valley and a strong Pacific storm coming into the Northwest, we examined the trend in the number of days each year with heavy precipitation at 244 individual sites in the U.S. This expands our nationwide-averaged heavy precipitation analysis from earlier this year, complementing the 2017 Climate Science

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allergy season and climate change

Here’s How Frost-Free Season Affects Allergy Season

Pollen allergies are not just a nuisance. Asthma symptoms can be triggered by exposure to pollen, with the number of emergency room visits increasing on days with high pollen. An analysis of emergency room visits in New York City during 1999 showed peaks in the number of visits correlated with high spring pollen counts, and is consistent with other

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Longer frost-free seasons mean longer allergy seasons

Growing Season Growth: Additional Frost Free Days

​As the climate warms from the increase of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, the last spring freeze is trending earlier and the first fall freeze is coming later. This means the growing season is getting longer, and so is the pollen season— whether it is from tree pollens in the spring, grass pollens in the summer, or ragweed in the fall. A

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western snowpack trends

Western Snowpack Trends

April 1 marks the close of the winter precipitation season in the West, a good time to take stock of the snowpack in the mountains. The snow measurement indicates how much meltwater from that snowpack will be available for residential, agricultural, and commercial use during the dry summer months that follow. Even with the heavier snow in parts of

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more snow, less snow

These U.S. Cities Are Getting More (and Less) Snow

There were some unusual highs and lows to snowfall totals across the U.S. this winter. Take a look at the long-term trends in total snow for more than 1,100 sites.

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cherry blossoms in a changing climate

Cherry Blossoms in a Changing Climate

The blooming of the cherry blossoms along the Tidal Basin of Washington, D.C. is an annual rite of spring. During the period from 1981-2010, the average peak bloom date was April 1. This year, the National Park Service forecasts the blossoms to peak slightly earlier than average, between March 27-31. The warm February was the reason that both the

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