Tropical Storm Adrian Forms, Earliest Known Storm in Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Adrian became the earliest known tropical storm to form in the eastern North Pacific on Wednesday, six days before the official May 15 start to the season. This is also the first time in the satellite era where early storms formed in both the Atlantic and eastern Pacific — Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the Atlantic as a fairly rare

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U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

After years of intense, record-setting drought across the U.S., particularly in the Great Plains and California, the country is now experiencing its lowest level of drought in the 17 years since the U.S. Drought Monitor began its weekly updates. Less than 5 percent of the U.S. was in some stage of drought as of May 4, the most recent update

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High Streamflow is Increasing, Raising Flood Risks

With the frequency of heavy precipitation increasing across most of the U.S., it follows that streamflow levels may be increasing as well. A Climate Central analysis of streamflow data at more than 2,100 active gauges found that the number of days with high stream flow (the top 25 percent of readings) has risen over the past 30 years in the largest

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Historic Flooding Continues in the Mississippi Valley

Rain has ended in the Mississippi Valley, but the damage has been done. Communities along the Mississippi River and its tributaries in Missouri, Illinois, and Arkansas, remain submerged by floodwaters that will take several days to recede. The Mississippi River near Cape Girardeau, Mo., is expected to peak within a few inches of a record crest

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weather extremes

Heat, Snow, Tornadoes, Flooding: Just One Week’s Worth of Weather

Over the course of just 48 hours this week, summer-like heat hit the Northeast, heavy snow fell in the Rockies, and tornadoes touched down in the Plains, all while the lower Mississippi River remains at flood levels. The heat wave that surged into the Northeast brought multiple days of temperatures that would have been high even for the middle of

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Hottest Days Coming Earlier

With Memorial Day and the unofficial summer vacation season just around the corner, summer heat will soon begin to settle in. After a phenomenally warm February for much of the country, many of you have been asking us to take a look at how much earlier in the year the first occurrence of summer-like high temperatures are arriving.

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Tropical Storm Adrian

Tropical Storm Adrian Forms, Earliest Known Storm in Eastern Pacific

Tropical Storm Adrian became the earliest known tropical storm to form in the eastern North Pacific on Wednesday, six days before the official May 15 start to the season. This is also the first time in the satellite era where early storms formed in both the Atlantic and eastern Pacific — Tropical Storm Arlene formed in the Atlantic as a fairly rare

more
streamflow

High Streamflow is Increasing, Raising Flood Risks

With the frequency of heavy precipitation increasing across most of the U.S., it follows that streamflow levels may be increasing as well. A Climate Central analysis of streamflow data at more than 2,100 active gauges found that the number of days with high stream flow (the top 25 percent of readings) has risen over the past 30 years in the largest

more
drought monitor

U.S. Drought at Lowest Level in Nearly Two Decades

After years of intense, record-setting drought across the U.S., particularly in the Great Plains and California, the country is now experiencing its lowest level of drought in the 17 years since the U.S. Drought Monitor began its weekly updates. Less than 5 percent of the U.S. was in some stage of drought as of May 4, the most recent update

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precip map

Historic Flooding Continues in the Mississippi Valley

Rain has ended in the Mississippi Valley, but the damage has been done. Communities along the Mississippi River and its tributaries in Missouri, Illinois, and Arkansas, remain submerged by floodwaters that will take several days to recede. The Mississippi River near Cape Girardeau, Mo., is expected to peak within a few inches of a record crest

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heavy downpours

Here’s Where Heavy Rain is Increasing the Most in U.S.

Heavier precipitation is a signature of climate change. For every 1°F of temperature increase, the atmosphere can effectively hold 4 percent more water vapor. So as the world warms from the increase in greenhouse gases, the amount of evaporation also increases from oceans, lakes, rivers, and soils. The extra water vapor is available to produce

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Cowbell fire in Florida

The Climate Context for Raleigh’s Rains and Florida’s Fires

Two opposing weather situations are playing out right now in the Southeast: While parts of North Carolina are submerged thanks to a record downpour, Florida is battling wildfires fueled by a drought that now outranks the one in California. While these conditions sit at opposite ends of the weather seesaw, both may be affected by a changing climate.

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Tropical Depression 1

Tropical Depression Brings Early Start to 2017 Hurricane Season

Hurricane season is off to an early start this year with Tropical Depression 1 churning out over the Atlantic Ocean more than a month before the official start of the season. But while it’s an early bird, the storm won’t impact land and is expected to dissipate by Friday. It’s not unheard of to see storms form early, as the official season is a

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hurricane joaquin

Here’s Your Early Hurricane Season Preview

Spring is in full bloom in the U.S., which means summer isn’t far behind. And with this march of the seasons, the risk for hurricanes returns. Inevitably, there is a desire to know how active the season is going to be as far in advance as possible. This season looks to be just slightly less active than average, which translates to a slightly

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last spring freeze

Fewer Freezing Nights

The growing season is underway in parts of the U.S., primarily in the Southeast. As the world warms, the average date of that last spring freeze is occurring earlier in the year, extending that season. While the longer growing season does have some benefits, it also raises concerns about both agriculture and health. Consistently warmer weather help

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el nino in 2015

Could Another El Niño Be Brewing? Only Time Will Tell

Just over a year ago, the Earth was coming off of one of the strongest El Niños on record. Waters in the eastern Pacific warmed by El Niño began to cool toward normal in summer and even edged in the opposite direction — as sometimes happens — toward a La Niña. That cooling reached modest levels through the fall, registering as a weak La Niña. Now

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